In a recent study, moderate-intensity exercise such as walking briskly and light cycling was shown to boost mood for up to 12 hours. Exercising every day might be best to lift your mood, but strive for at least 5 days a week. Another study showed exercise can improve your body image, regardless of body weight or shape. And feeling good about your body is a great start toward making the bedroom a happier place.
Erythrocytosis has been noted in men on TRT, and should be monitored every 6–12 months depending upon the patients’ response to changes in haematocrit levels. For mild elevations, the dosage of testosterone can be decreased or the interval of using the medication can be increased. With the haematocrit greater than 50%, decisions to temporarily discontinue the medication or periodic phlebotomy may be indicated.38
Acupuncture. Though acupuncture has been used to treat male sexual problems for centuries, the scientific evidence to support its use for erectile dysfunction is equivocal at best. In 2009, South Korean scientists conducted a systematic review of studies on acupuncture for ED. They found major design flaws in all of the studies, concluding that "the evidence is insufficient to suggest that acupuncture is an effective intervention for treating ED."
Experts feel that treating erectile dysfunction on your own, without consulting a doctor, is unsafe. "If you have ED, the first thing you need is a diagnosis," says impotence expert Steven Lamm, MD, a New York City internist and the author of The Hardness Factor (Harper Collins) and other books on male sexual health. He says men with severe erectile dysfunction probably need one of the prescription ED drugs, which include Levitra (vardenafil) and Cialis (tadalafil) as well as Viagra. But, he says, mild ED -- including the feeling that "you're not as hard as you could be" -- often responds to natural remedies.
Qaseem, A., Snow, V., Denberg, T. D., Casey, D. E., Forciea, M. A., Owens, D. K., & Shekelle, P. (2009). Hormonal testing and pharmacologic treatment of erectile dysfunction: A clinical practice guideline from the American College of Physicians. Annals of internal medicine, 151(9), 639-649. Retrieved from http://annals.org/aim/article/745155/hormonal-testing-pharmacologic-treatment-erectile-dysfunction-clinical-practice-guideline-from
Yohimbe. Before Viagra and the other prescription erectile dysfunction drugs became available, doctors sometimes prescribed a derivative of the herb yohimbe (yohimbine hydrochloride) to their patients suffering from ED. But experts say the medication is not particularly effective, and it can cause jitteriness and other problems. "It's not a great drug," says McCullough. "And I suspect the herb is not as potent as the pharmaceutical version." What's more, evidence shows that yohimbe is associated with high blood pressure, anxiety, headache, and other health problems. Experts discourage its use.
Dr. Werner says, “A recent study of men (after prostate surgery) who committed to a program of penile rehabilitation showed that 52 percent of them recovered unassisted functional erections, compared to a recovery of 19 percent in the group who did not participate in rehabilitation.” In this same study, 64 percent of men who went through penis rehab recovered adequate erections with Viagra, compared to 24 percent of other men.
Erectile dysfunction can be a very serious issue as it is a marker of underlying cardiovascular disease and many times occurs before heart conditions manifest. Men should maintain a healthy weight adhere to good nutrition habits exercise drink alcohol in moderation (if at all) and get quality sleep. It is also important to address risk factors such as diabetes and high blood pressure. Not only will this improve their sexual ability but it will also support their cardiovascular health and help reduce the risk of developing diabetes. 
Three of the randomized studies (25–27) that contributed to the present study data indicated the positive role of both interval and continuous aerobic training in the dual management of both ED and cardiovascular disorders (hypertension and ischemic heart disease ,respectively); this is not surprising because of the arterogenic interrelationship between ED and several cardiovascular disorders. The physiological basis for the therapeutic role of continuous exercise in the management of both ED and some cardiovascular disorders as reported in the present study, could be related to the biochemical, neural and hormonal changes in the blood vessel walls that induce an acute and long-term blood vessel relaxation. The blood vessels might relax after each exercise session because of body warming effects; local production of certain chemicals, such lactic acid and NO; decreases in nerve activity; and changes in certain hormones and their receptors (32, 33). Over time, as the exercise is repeated, there appears to be a growing evidence of a prolonged effect. Thus, chronic (regular, longterm) physical training might reduce basal concentrations of inflammatory markers.
Antioxidants  boost nitric oxide production and prevent NO breakdown. Ascorbic acid has direct effects on the bioactivity of NO, and augments NO production in a variety of body processes. The effects are actually synergistic with Vitamin E. Both vitamins are not usually measured, and a reasonable dose of Vitamin C is 500 to 1,000 mg daily. Vitamin E supplementation should be limited to <400 IU per day because of potential adverse long-term health effects of higher doses.
Exercise lowers blood pressure – a consistently high blood pressure (hypertension) can damage your arteries and cause them to harden, limiting the flow of blood to the penis and leading to cardiovascular problems. Exercise works to reduce the force required to pump blood around your body, protecting your artery linings as a result. You should aim to have a blood pressure less than 140/90mm Hg.

Having your current medication checked – if you are taking medication already, it could be that your erection problems are a side effect. Have a doctor check whether this is the cause of your problems and if it is, you might be able to switch medications and then find that your erectile dysfunction goes away completely – or at least improves. Medications that can cause erection problems include:


In conclusion, aerobic training can successfully treat ED in selected patients with arterogenic ED. However, there are very few high-quality randomized trials regarding aerobic training and ED. Practitioners should bear in mind that aerobic training and other risk factors modification is associated with higher rates of ED management success.Since these results are based on small studies, the evidence would be stronger if confirmed by large trials. Effectiveness data were limited; however, the effectiveness of ED is largely determined by the patient health status and associated condition. In addition, work is needed in the standardization of follow-up protocols, evaluation of ED management success and failure, patient selection, and statistical analysis. More randomized studies that compare various exercise techniques are warranted. These studies should evaluate efficacy, complications, quality of life, cost implications, and long-term outcomes of ED management compare to other therapeutic modalities available. Also more database search is also warranted to further broaden the data search on the topic.
A couple of final tips: First, don’t forget to check your testosterone level. Testosterone is frequently low in men with diabetes and can cause loss of sexual interest and function. Don’t stop doing the non-intercourse sex practices you and your wife have discovered. Finally, if erections are important to you, we encourage you not to wait. The longer the blood vessels stay blocked or leaking, the longer it will take to recover function.
I recently treated a young twenty-something man with a primary complaint of erectile dysfunction. When he started to notice this issue, he attempted to treat it by performing lots of kegels. (If you haven’t heard of kegel exercises, they’re done by repeatedly contracting and relaxing the muscles that form part of the pelvic floor, as if you were trying to stop peeing mid-stream.) I found this man’s story interesting because, as we discovered, in his case the kegels actually did more harm than good. We found that once he stopped kegeling and allowed his pelvic muscles to relax, his erections became stronger and he was able to ejaculate without any issues.
The pathogenesis of organic ED is related to dysfunction of the endothelium. Endothelial cells can become injured through a variety of mechanisms, most of which cause oxidative stress on the tissues. Many of these causes of oxidative stress are related to lifestyle issues which lead to hypertension, diabetes and dyslipidaemia (figure 1). Endothelial cell dysfunction results in reduction of endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation as well as increased adhesion of leukocytes to the endothelium. Endothelial cell injury then leads to a variety of sequelae, including ED, other types of vasoconstriction, atherosclerosis and thrombus formation.18

Erection is a complex physiological process in which vascular factors play a pre-eminent role. Therapeutic options for men with arteriogenic erectile dysfunction (ED) are mainly administration of phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors, intracavernous injections of vasoactive agents (for example, prostaglandin El, papaverine/phentolamine, or triple drug), intraurethral administration of prostaglandin El, and administration of centrally acting drugs (11, 12). However, all of these methods circumvent the patient's problem temporarily, and patients are not cured of impotence, they will remain dependent on these treatments for the remainder of their sexually active lives. An effective treatment that cures the problem permanently is needed where penile revascularization and exercise remain treatment options for such patients. However, due to the complexity of penile revascularization such as cost ineffectiveness, unavailability of experts, side effects of surgery and high failure rates among the elderly (13) have left people with ED at the mercy of exercise.
Our bodies are designed to be active and in motion. By keeping active and engaging in regular aerobic exercise, you increase the blood flow to your muscles, and your penis along the way. One of the most interesting things about increasing your blood flow is that it becomes a signal to your blood vessels to grow and get wider. It benefits your brain, your heart, and your erection. The principle of "use it or lose it" is the best advise one can follow. In fact, if you don't engage in sexual activity at least once or twice a week, it would be beneficial to masturbate. This not only helps with prostate health, but encourages the blood vessels that contribute to your erection to maintain their patency and flow. 
Muse on the other hand can cause a burning sensation to the penis along the urethra (this happens around 20% of the time) and it takes a little longer to work than the injectable formulation. But for men that don’t want a needle in their penis, it is an alternative. I generally recommend starting with Muse prior to moving onto Caverject because of this.

There have been some fishy results on fish oil. It's purported to lower blood pressure, reduce serum triglycerides, decrease the risk of stroke, and ameliorate arthritis. But scientists recently reported that fish oil does something else—it may cause fat to accumulate in the liver and result in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, a particularly harmful form of fatty liver disease. However, the scientists also found that another type of oil causes the least damage to the liver. Read here to find out more.


Research is mixed on the effectiveness of acupuncture as an erectile dysfunction cure, but one study published in November 2013 in the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine found that acupuncture can be beneficial for men experiencing erectile dysfunction as a side effect of antidepressants, including selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs).

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