Yes. Stress definitely can cause erectile dysfunction (ED). It may become an issue with a new relationship or when challenges at work become overwhelming. These issues can interfere with “erotic focus” or “awareness of sensory experience.” Basically, it can take someone out of “the moment” making maintaining an erection a challenge. In fact, while stress is a common cause of erectile dysfunction in those under the age of 40, it can be responsible for ED at any age. Also, while younger men are more likely to have a psychological reason for their ED, physical reasons cannot be excluded. Nevertheless, in younger men the causes are often related to stress, depression, extreme anxiety, or some other disruption in their emotional state. Young men may have physical reasons that cause ED, including issues like abnormal hormone production, trauma that affects the blood vessels of the penis, Peyronie’s disease that causes a bend in the penis, neurological conditions that affect the transmission of signals that result in erections, drug or alcohol use, or the use of medications as simple as antihistamines. Also, in men under the age of 40, ED can be an early sign that vascular disease is beginning to affect them. An erection is an indicator of a man’s general health. It is always worth exploring the possible physical issues that could be at work. Nevertheless, in the younger population stress and depression are not uncommon causes of ED.
In some cases, ED can be a warning sign of more serious disease. One study suggests ED is a strong predictor of heart attack, stroke, and death from cardiovascular disease. The researchers say all men diagnosed with ED should be evaluated for cardiovascular disease. This does not mean every man with ED will develop heart disease, or that every man with heart disease has ED, but patients should be aware of the link.
Modern drug therapy for ED made a significant advance in 1983, when British physiologist Giles Brindley dropped his trousers and demonstrated to a shocked Urodynamics Society audience his papaverine-induced erection.[44] The drug Brindley injected into his penis was a non-specific vasodilator, an alpha-blocking agent, and the mechanism of action was clearly corporal smooth muscle relaxation. The effect that Brindley discovered established the fundamentals for the later development of specific, safe, and orally effective drug therapies.[45][better source needed][46][better source needed]

Psychological issues can affect more than just your mental health. Depression, anxiety, stress, and relationship problems can have a tremendous effect on your sexual function. If you’re experiencing ED along with psychological issues, talk with your doctor. Together, you and your doctor can find a cause and a treatment to bring your sexual health back to normal.
Certain medications can interfere with nerve impulses or blood flow to the penis. According to a report by Harvard University, about 25 percent of men dealing with erectile dysfunction are having problems because of a medication they take. In fact, ED is one of the main reasons some men stop taking medication for conditions such as high blood pressure and depression.

Your GP will check your blood pressure, cardiovascular health (heart and blood vessels) and perform blood tests to check your cholesterol and blood sugar levels. If you are over 50, it is important that your GP also examines your prostate. Depending on your general health, the GP may need to do other tests, for example blood tests for hormone levels.


One reason erectile dysfunction becomes more common with age is that older men are more likely to be on some kind of medication. In fact, an estimated 25% of all ED is a side effect of drugs, according to the Harvard Special Health Report Erectile Dysfunction: How medication, lifestyle changes, and other therapies can help you conquer this vexing problem.

Erections are extremely complicated and surprisingly fragile. Erections involve chemical signals, nerve impulses, complicated blood pressure changes, and overall fitness in systems ranging from your heart and hormones to your mood. When medication changes how one of these factors works—like blood pressure drops or depression medication—ED is a common side effect. The problem with these completely predictable medically induced side effects is how people react.


If you or your partner experience erectile dysfunction while taking a drug, tell your doctor so she can switch you to another class that may not have as powerful an effect. For example, switching from an SSRI to Wellbutrin (bupropion) seems to help alleviate arousal and interest issues that are common in people who take SSRIs. So does switching from a beta-blocker for high blood pressure to an angiotensin receptor blocker such as losartan or valsartan.

One study looked at men newly diagnosed with heart disease, but without ED, who started treatment with the beta blocker atenolol (Tenormin). Among those who were told about the drug's potential sexual side effects, almost a third reported ED. In contrast, of those who were not told the drug's name or its side effects, only 3% said they experienced ED.

Certain feelings can interfere with normal sexual function, including feeling nervous about or self-conscious about sex, feeling stressed either at home or at work, or feeling troubled in your current sexual relationship. In these cases, treatment incorporating psychological counseling with you and your sexual partner may be successful. One episode of failure, regardless of cause, may propagate further psychological distress, leading to further erectile failure. Los of desire or interest in sexual activity can be psychological or due to low testosterone levels.


Yes, the vacuum device is effective. In fact, with use of the vacuum device, 88% of men will have an erection that is satisfactory for completion of sexual activity. The vacuum device may be the only therapy that is effective after the removal of a penile prosthesis. Patients also use vacuum devices as part of penile rehabilitation after radical prostatectomy to help preserve the tissue of the penis and prevent scarring within the penis and loss of penile length. Its use, however, is limited by the mechanical nature of it and the time taken to pump the device and apply the band. Sex partners may complain of the penis being cool to touch.
Changing to an alternative drug is recommended for men and women taking antihypertensives. Alpha blockers, ACE inhibitors and calcium channel blockers are not considered to cause erectile dysfunction,54 while several studies have suggested that angiotensin II receptor antagonists may even improve sexual function. Beta 1 -selective beta blockers such as nebivolol may have potential advantages in these patients.55
A chemical imbalance in brain leads to depression which not only affects the sexual performance but can also lower the libido. Compared to women, depression in men is more difficult to diagnose. In fact, many men don’t even know that they are suffering from depression and even if they find out they are often not willing to seek appropriate treatment.
The time the dose should be taken and how long the effects last depend on the medication used. The most common side effect of these medications is a headache. However, there is a potential for certain dangerous drug interactions. Anyone prescribed this medication must let his doctor know about any medications he's on, and especially if he's taking nitrates (e.g., nitroglycerin spray, nitroglycerin pills, or nitroglycerin patch) for heart problems.
A vacuum erection device is a plastic tube that slips over the penis, making a seal with the skin of the body. A pump at the other end of the tube makes a low-pressure vacuum around the erectile tissue, which results in an erection. An elastic ring is then slipped onto the base of the penis. This holds the blood in the penis (and keeps it hard) for up to 30 minutes. With proper training, 75 out of 100 men can get a working erection using a vacuum erection device.

The main surgical treatment of ED involves insertion of a penile implant (also called penile prostheses). Because penile vascular surgery is not recommended for aging males who have failed oral PDE5 inhibitors, ICI or IU therapies, implants are the next step for these patients. Although placement of a penile implant is a surgery which carries risks, they have the highest rates of success and satisfaction among ED treatment options.
Medications used to treat high blood pressure (hypertension), including diuretics and beta-blockers, may cause ED. Not all blood pressure medications are associated with ED; alpha-blockers, ACE inhibitors, calcium channel blockers, and angiotensin II receptor blockers don't appear to cause ED. If you are on a blood pressure medication, have an ED talk with your doctor about whether or not your medication may be contributing to your ED and if there is an alternative blood pressure medication that is safe for you to try.

In patients with low testosterone, testosterone treatment can improve libido and erectile dysfunction, but many men still may need additional oral medications such as sildenafil, vardenafil, or tadalafil. Some studies suggest that men with ED and low testosterone may respond better to PDE5 inhibitors when given testosterone therapy; however, this is controversial.


Attempts to treat erectile dysfunction date back well over 1,000 years. In the 8th century, men of Ancient Rome and Greece wore talismans of rooster and goat genitalia, believing these talismans would serve as an aphrodisiac and promote sexual function.[42] In the 13th century Albertus Magnus recommended ingesting roasted wolf penis as a remedy for impotence[42].
Some men say certain alternative medicines taken by mouth can help them get and maintain an erection. However, not all “natural” medicines or supplements are safe. Combinations of certain prescribed and alternative medicines could cause major health problems. To help ensure coordinated and safe care, discuss your use of alternative medicines, including use of vitamin and mineral supplements, with a health care professional. Also, never order a medicine online without talking with your doctor.
Vacuum devices for ED, also called pumps, offer an alternative to medication. The penis is placed inside a cylinder. A pump draws air out of the cylinder, creating a partial vacuum around the penis. This causes it to fill with blood, leading to an erection. An elastic band worn around the base of the penis maintains the erection during intercourse.
Talk with your doctor about going to a counselor if psychological or emotional issues are affecting your ED. A counselor can teach you how to lower your anxiety or stress related to sex. Your counselor may suggest that you bring your partner to counseling sessions to learn how to support you. As you work on relieving your anxiety or stress, a doctor can focus on treating the physical causes of ED.
In some cases, ED can be a warning sign of more serious disease. One study suggests ED is a strong predictor of heart attack, stroke, and death from cardiovascular disease. The researchers say all men diagnosed with ED should be evaluated for cardiovascular disease. This does not mean every man with ED will develop heart disease, or that every man with heart disease has ED, but patients should be aware of the link.
It's a really good article! Masturbation has a very bad for sexual stamina. If you watch porn, for example, it's up to you when you are coming. You don't need to pay attention to give orgasms to your woman. Porn is one of the main reason of erectile dysfunction. However, one thing we can learn from porn actors. How to keep their errections soo long that they can shoot scenes basically all day.
The link between chronic disease and ED is most striking for diabetes. Men who have diabetes are two to three times more likely to have erectile dysfunction than men who do not have diabetes. Among men with erectile dysfunction, those with diabetes may experience the problem as much as 10 to 15 years earlier than men without diabetes. Yet evidence shows that good blood sugar control can minimize this risk. Other conditions that may cause ED include cardiovascular disease, atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries), kidney disease, and multiple sclerosis. These illnesses can impair blood flow or nerve impulses throughout the body.
Many different health conditions can affect the nerves, muscles, or blood flow that is needed to have an erection. Diabetes, high blood pressure, hardening of the arteries, spinal cord injuries, and multiple sclerosis can contribute to ED. Surgery to treat prostate or bladder problems can also affect the nerves and blood vessels that control an erection.
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